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Emigrating and integrating without losing your identity?
Hi Everybody,

How is it possible to emigrate and integrate without losing your Moroccan identity?
After overcoming a number of problems (financial, administrative and emotional), you manage to emigrate… Then you realize that your problems are far from being finished as you face the ultimate problem: Integration.
According to your experience or any other Moroccan’s experience in general, how easy or difficult is it to make a place in the host country while keeping the roots of your country of origin (Morocco)? Are you accepted and recognized in the host country? Are you still considered as the same one who left when you go back to your home country? Please share your point of view with us and tell us what made your integration easy and how you managed to give a good representation of your country of origin within your country of "adoption"?

Thank you so much for your anticipated participation.
Hi there,

I live in France and I have never had problems regarding integration...I mean at home, we're trying to stick to our traditional ways and outside I do share my Moroccan culture with the others and people do appreciate that because we learn so much sharing!

When I go back to my native country, people are a kind of surprised because I do speak arabic and also because I do love talking about Morocco...

The thing is you should open up to people around you and should also be delighted to "promote" your country of origin.

Just be yourself and try to get the best of it!

Have a sweet eveningsmiling smiley

Latifa



Elegance is an attitude

Thank you, my dear friends, for all your sweet messages, I love you too...



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/19/2010 09:07PM by Sweetlatifa.
Thank you so much for such an interesting subject. The answer is not straight forward and is not short only.
From an early age and as soon as we start to analyse our society we learnt that our country of origin has not furnished the youth with options to do and to live there. There is the option to learnt to swim to cross the channel and change to the reality that most people dream of.
No matter where you go, what you do, there is one thing that will not change that is who gave birth to you and where you were born and raised up, and these are facts. Personality wise is something else. It starts with having to learn the language, to adjust to the new culture and accept the way they do things and to not necessarily do them too. I was shocked to find people are more reserve than other countries and are laid back in relationships.
One needs to analyse the new society too not all what glitters is gold. The Europeans are not much better than us even with all their facilities. If we take advantage of this point of various facilities, we can do better then the majority of the host public. I have decided to leave my country to improve my life and future not to live worse than back home. The only way to be able to do that is to study and learn. It gave me an amazing will and drives to achieve qualifications and qualifications.

The way how I looked at it more then quarter of the century ago; I left home due to political reasons (no need to go into that) as well as wanted to achieve more and to have more of a living than to just subsist. I wouldn’t accept and allow anyone to look down at me in anyway or manner. I respect myself and expect no less respect from others. I know my freedom is similar to anyone else’s in this country. My freedom stops where others start. There are regulations and laws in this country I respect and adhere to.
Being Moroccan is not an issue in my host country. I have learnt to not trust anyone and I know for certain that the British nation is not open when it comes to their feelings. To my face they have to take what I deem nice behaviour what they do behind my back is entirely their problem. I am certain if someone approaches me with any thing bothering them, within reasons I will accommodate their wish as long as it is not at my expense.
Being Moroccan in Morocco is a long story weather you live abroad or just visiting for a couple of weeks.
cryingcryingcryingcrying



Adds adds jazz but never subtract music
i love my country and proud of my origins , there are people who are bitter and blame morocco of their failures in life, but the truth is a winner is always a winner no matter where he/or she lives , success needs a lot of efforts and there are some young moroccans inside morocco who re thanks to their hard word are successful
personnally i enjoy the best of both worlds grinning smiley i achieved success in my country and outside it , combining the two cultures gives a wonderful rich life .
Thank you (Both Latifa and Adds) for your opinions which I respect a lot. You just made more proud than I am as a Moroccan as you are the integration personified. Yes Latifa, promoting your home country by talking about it, mixing with people of the host country and by just being yourself as you said, does work for your integration and makes it easier. While sticking to your culture and your family ties when you are at home does help you keep your roots deep in your heart. Congrats!
Adds: You hit the nail on the coffin when you said:” The Europeans are not much better than us even with all their facilities. If we take advantage of this point of various facilities, we can do better than the majority of the host public”. Just to tell you that this is not arrogance but Reality and I can see you saying it loudly. “The only way to be able to do that is to study and learn. It gave me an amazing will and drives to achieve qualifications and qualifications.” If I am not mistaken, I can see that integrity for you is not given but earned and one should not look to be accepted in the host country but recognized. Your secret weapon to achieve that was studying, learning and accumulating qualifications. No wonder why you have no integration problems. You are like that excellent athlete who both countries are chasing him/her to represent them in the world cup or the Olympics. Nevertheless and in order not to be accused of chauvinism, we must acknowledge that there some of our countrymen that are facing the problem of integration in different parts of the world and they need to hear from you through your contribution. Example1: Some think that marrying a man/woman of the host country make the integration easier?? (Please I am not discussing the marriage to non Moroccan as I respect everybody’s choice). Example2: What happens to our kids, brothers, sisters or any member of our families who were born in the country of adoption or lived there for decades and now want to go back to the home country? Aren’t they going to face a problem of reintegration? Example3: Do you find it difficult to brag about being Moroccan due to what happened in the world during the last decade?
There so many examples, PLEASE SPEAK YOUR MIND and thank you once again.
Hismiling smiley,

Well, intergration does not mean loosing your own heritage...

You should succeed in finding the "happy medium" in order to reach harmony between both your cultural identity and the country you live in.

As far as I am concerned, one of my relatives has married a french woman and they both agreed, right from the beginning, on sticking to their mutual culture.

They have a child now and the latter has inherited from his parents'cultural treasure.

For sure, this is a personal issue as I know many people who forgot about their country of origin to reach integration. To be honest, I will never understand this way of proceeding...as I am personaly convinced that we can benefit from both cultures.

We should never forget where we're from to step forward...

I'll be back!

Sweet Dreamssmiling smiley

Latifa



Elegance is an attitude

Thank you, my dear friends, for all your sweet messages, I love you too...



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/20/2010 11:51PM by Sweetlatifa.
Hi Thetiger,

You are a tiger indeed! You are ‘aggressive’, a go getter and it pays off. Never mind about the moaners. I think that they are not losers; they are rather choosers as they chose loosing. As human beings, we are all born winners as each of us had to beat millions of other sperms to be the one! If you see what I am driving at! So I don’t see where the loosing part came from! It’s all in the mind, their mind! You are right: a winner is always winner. I like your self assurance, your love for your country and especially the way you managed to combine the two cultures. The Moroccan is a hard working versatile individual by nature inside and outside his country. In your case you have all the right to brag about it. Congrats!
HiLatifa,

I am really thrilled with your answer. According to me, it summarizes what integrity is all about.
On the other hand, the success story of the fusion of two cultures through marriage which you gave as an example can only be described as a perfect marriage and a true example of integration. It seems to me that this relationship is based on a mutual respect and both parties did not allow their marriage to consume their culture nor their different cultures consume their marriage.
As far as those who "forgot" about their country of origin are concerned, they are in no man's land and they are neither chimpanzees nor human beings, they are just................ missing links!

Greetings to all those who are proudly Moroccans.
Hismiling smiley

Yes this is The key-word: Respect...

We should respect what we are and what the others have to offer...

Sharing is such a wonderful thing!

As far as I am concerned, I feel I am International!!!

Have a sweet eveningsmiling smiley

Latifa

Quote
Proudly Moroccan
HiLatifa,

I am really thrilled with your answer. According to me, it summarizes what integrity is all about.
On the other hand, the success story of the fusion of two cultures through marriage which you gave as an example can only be described as a perfect marriage and a true example of integration. It seems to me that this relationship is based on a mutual respect and both parties did not allow their marriage to consume their culture nor their different cultures consume their marriage.
As far as those who "forgot" about their country of origin are concerned, they are in no man's land and they are neither chimpanzees nor human beings, they are just................ missing links!

Greetings to all those who are proudly Moroccans.



Elegance is an attitude

Thank you, my dear friends, for all your sweet messages, I love you too...
Proud Moroccan I have to congratulate you for your way of replying to posts. You have nice, gentle and to the point way of replying I kike that.
Analysing carefully others speech and behaviour and seeing the other sides’ point of view can only lead to good harmony. Given time the other party will join the same way of interaction (there are a few exceptions of course).
In the number of Moroccan I have spoken to and thier experience marrying someone from different culture is not recommendable to anyone. It is harder work of both parties; the marriage is on a constant strain unless one side is taking all the pressure. Most marriages end up in separation or divorce after a long time.
Why they don’t work in my humble opinion; the input of a number of attributes overwhelms the comprehension of the individuals. The various parts that will radiate problems constantly include different background, different upbringing, and different language different social behaviour ( as well as religion and politics). One no matter how hard will try to over look differences, one will always sees them and they will be there in the relationship. They could be as little as watching TV programs or listening to traditional Moroccan music like Gnawa. Moroccan jokes, going on holiday etc.

Children will suffer directly or indirectly the European culture will take over in anyway; the language will be mainly European with a few words Moroccan. When they go back if they do go, do you think people back home will see them as Moroccan or as immigration papers?
After all this you get other contributions from both families and Mother in-laws…

Soon or later one finds oneself watching TV alone, travelling alone, sleeping alone, laughing alone, crying alone and the patience has run out as well as the youth, the vision is reduces and the picture of the future is blurred is it worth it?

However it is doable if both parties involved decide to keep to European culture mainly. From the age of 16 or even earlier, parents will not have much authority on the children in anyways. The children rebel at this stage as a rejection of the reality and here where questions will need to be answered.
The relationship with the partner takes forms and shapes of shadows each party involved bottle up the pressure the energy rise fast and the atmosphere can be cut with a knife…
Even Moroccan couples struggle in these instances. One has to make sure not to end up like the crow who imitated the pigeon’s “hmama” walk.

Regards

Sring is here at last enjoy it.



Adds adds jazz but never subtract music
Errors in the above I noticed so farOups
kike =like
sring= Spring



Adds adds jazz but never subtract music
Thank you once again for your valuable contributions.

"Sweet Latifa", I guess that our friend "Adds"; has a different point of view with regard to marrying into the host culture. I see where you are coming frm "Adds", I do respect your point of view and tend to agree with it... to certain extent. I think that a bi-cultural marriage is just as fragile as any other marriage if it is not built on honesty and treating the other with dignity and respect.

I will probably surprise you if I say that my own marriage to a non Moroccan was a failure! The reason was simply: ME! I refused to integrate; I wanted to build another Morocco on somebody's land! I listened to my traditional music all the time, I used only my mother tongue (Arabic obviously) when I have Moroccans around me, no more alcohol in my house (not even for religious reasons but for fear of tarnishing my Moroccan image); The list goes on and on. As "only one party was taking the pressure", the marriage crumbled down. "Adds", this is the part that you got right so far.
Looking back to "the monster" that I was, now I can sing: I did it my "Moroccan" way and I was wrong.

However, there are some successful solid mixed marriages which every year are going from strength to another. Those that managed to somehow enjoy listening to both Beethoven and "Stati", dance on the rhythm of both Tango and "Jerra" and watch both The Opera and "chikhaat al Atlas". I am sure you heard if not listened to the combination of Gnawa music and jazz, isn't it nice?

Unfortunately, I haven't been to Morocco for quite a while but I guess that the mentality is changing, for better of course. Hopefully enough not to use our kids as "immigration papers".
By the way, I am very proud of a lot of my compatriots whose contributions in the forum are just fabulous and reflect their excellent level linguistically and intellectually.

"Adds", you don't need to apologize for two small typing errors. You contributions clearly shows that you belong to the Moroccan elite. Really proud of you. Keep it up.

Dima Dima Moroccan!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/24/2010 05:06PM by Proudly Moroccan.
Hi theresmiling smiley

Well, when you make up your mind sharing your life with the person you're in love with, you have to share her way of life too...

You cannot impose your cultural identity on anyone, you need to find the "Happy Medium"...

I guess you signed "Morocco" across your heart (reminds me of a songsmiling smiley)!

I do agree with you, you shouldn't forget your roots!

Tell me, when you say " I haven't been to Morocco for quite a while but I guess that the mentality is changing, for better of course" What do you exactly mean?

Thanking you in advance.

Have a sweet evening.

Latifa




Quote
Proudly Moroccan
Thank you once again for your valuable contributions.

"Sweet Latifa", I guess that our friend "Adds"; has a different point of view with regard to marrying into the host culture. I see where you are coming frm "Adds", I do respect your point of view and tend to agree with it... to certain extent. I think that a bi-cultural marriage is just as fragile as any other marriage if it is not built on honesty and treating the other with dignity and respect.

I will probably surprise you if I say that my own marriage to a non Moroccan was a failure! The reason was simply: ME! I refused to integrate; I wanted to build another Morocco on somebody's land! I listened to my traditional music all the time, I used only my mother tongue (Arabic obviously) when I have Moroccans around me, no more alcohol in my house (not even for religious reasons but for fear of tarnishing my Moroccan image); The list goes on and on. As "only one party was taking the pressure", the marriage crumbled down. "Adds", this is the part that you got right so far.
Looking back to "the monster" that I was, now I can sing: I did it my "Moroccan" way and I was wrong.

However, there are some successful solid mixed marriages which every year are going from strength to another. Those that managed to somehow enjoy listening to both Beethoven and "Stati", dance on the rhythm of both Tango and "Jerra" and watch both The Opera and "chikhaat al Atlas". I am sure you heard if not listened to the combination of Gnawa music and jazz, isn't it nice?

Unfortunately, I haven't been to Morocco for quite a while but I guess that the mentality is changing, for better of course. Hopefully enough not to use our kids as "immigration papers".
By the way, I am very proud of a lot of my compatriots whose contributions in the forum are just fabulous and reflect their excellent level linguistically and intellectually.

"Adds", you don't need to apologize for two small typing errors. You contributions clearly shows that you belong to the Moroccan elite. Really proud of you. Keep it up.

Dima Dima Moroccan!



Elegance is an attitude

Thank you, my dear friends, for all your sweet messages, I love you too...



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/24/2010 07:48PM by Sweetlatifa.
Dear Friend

The way you behaved was not of a monster but it was in my opinion your subconscious behaviour. That is a retaliation to the opposite party. To certain levels you are Moroccan and that is part of you. The environment you grew up in is your safest one. Sorry to hear the marriage ended up; you mustn’t blame yourself for that. People who tried to integrate fully and gave up their identity completely their marriages ended up after many years of togetherness and harmony.
The majority of people reject the unknown; our true behaviour is alien to them because there are at home we are guests we will never ever be one of them. Their reaction causes other deeper behaviours to immerge. One guy turned to be very religious he even went to Hajj. Religion can comfort us and give us the feeling of security. I know this wasn’t your case and you were more concern about your reputation.
Some times when the partner requests attention by ignoring us ( common to ladies) we do things without any justifications but inside we are only craving for a “feeling important” and we do impose our culture as an escape ( not always in a spiteful way) and comfort.
I agree with you that there are some good marriages where both partners share cultures happily. The problem is lots of these good marriages end up with divorce given time with a very small exception. People grow older and their habits change, The thing they liked yesterday they can’t stand them for long today; sharing stops and become only one sided: you can share mine for the time being.
I have been regularly back home over last four years. Our people bless them!!!! They are so sweet and very accommodating to Europeans. There are some minute good changes and lots of bad one no need to list here.
The dream of the majority of the youth is to leave to France or Spain. Its not their fault they have nothing to keep them there. They do anything I mean anything even losing their dignity to just have that dream.
An educated bent a bladi is worth ten of the European but no gh3asoul on the hair (apologies, not trying to start any argument here I just love our ladies)


Regards



Adds adds jazz but never subtract music
Thank you guys for your comments.

Latifa, sorry for taking time to answer your question regarding what I meant by "I haven't been to Morocco for quite a while but I guess that the mentality is changing, for better of course" It was a simple reaction to Adds’ comment as we were discussing the possibility of reintegration of the children of Moroccan Immigrants in their home country (Morocco): "When they go back if they do go, do you think people back home will see them as Moroccan or as immigration papers?".
In the past (over two decades), I know for a fact that some Moroccans considered a marriage to a Moroccan (man or woman) is just as “good” as to a European as long as she/he is holding a European passport ; i.e. Using the person as a trampoline to land in Europe. That is what “Adds” referred to as being seen as “immigration papers” and that is what scares me if he is right.
Personally, I haven’t been to Morocco for about five years and even when I used to go regularly I stayed only for a week or two per year… Therefore, I cannot say whether there are still people who think like that or if the mentality has slightly changed. According to the news coming from the country, Morocco is going through a transitional period: change in the power (a new young King), boost in the economy (one of the best economic growths in Africa), more respect of human rights (release of some political detainees), more respect for the Moroccan woman (the new moudawana)…. There must be a positive change in the people’s mentality!
“Adds”, I know you are translating the reality and I trust your judgment. I can feel your constrictive criticism is coming straight from the heart of a true Moroccan. There is a positive change which is taking place…slowly but surely. It is just a question of time. I think it is our duty to send the signals whenever possible to the youngsters back home to tell them to stay where they are…The Eldorado does not exist! The key word is: EDUCATION.
Hi,

Hope you're doing wellsmiling smiley

For sure, in some way, Morocco is changing for the better but unfortunately the country is trying to imitate the western continent, I mean, by deserting its own culture...

I fear a loss of cultural identity...

For instance, when I go back to my native country, I notice that people there do not talk arabic anymore...I am a kind of surprised because we must stick to our heritage and keep it going!

I have always tried to understand this new tendancy to speak "french" instead of arabic...

Could it be more classy to have a dialogue using the french idiom?

It's just too bad...

What's your opinion on that?

Have a sweet daysmiling smiley

Latifa



Elegance is an attitude

Thank you, my dear friends, for all your sweet messages, I love you too...



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/27/2010 11:54AM by Sweetlatifa.
Hi Latifa,

Do not fear for the loss of the Moroccan heritage because it just won’t happen. French has always been the dominating language after Arabic and Berber in Morocco. Then, comes Spanish in the north of the country. As you know, this is one of the negative impacts that were left by the occupation but it doesn’t mean by any means that things should carry on like that.

Our people should wake up and smell the roses. The French language has nothing that is nicer or more romantic than any other languages. Unfortunately and according to some Moroccans, It seems that nothing has a value unless it is said in French or carries a French name…. even animals. How many pets (dogs or cats) do you know are given names in Arabic? Not necessarily a human being’s name but any name in Arabic.

The problem back home is that the majority of those who use the French language are mixing French and Arabic which led to the birth of a new dialect (Aranssia), soon we will have our own “Moroccan Créole”!!!
Back home, it is more acceptable and easier when expressing one’s love to say “je t’aime” than “Ouhibouk” or “kanbghik” !!!! it is believed to be more refined and adequate to say it in French and the chances to hear “C’est réciproque” or “Je t’aime moi aussi” are far greater than if said in Arabic!!! Another example: “est ce que tu peux me prêter cent Dirham s.t.p?” is believed to be lighter than “sillifni chi myat DH afaak!” and the asking person wants to give you the impression that you are dealing with an “educated” person with European “values” who will pay you back!!! People in Morocco use French mostly in embarrassing situations when thinking that Arabic is too straightforward. Some use French when they want to lie. Try to insist on somebody to tell you the truth and you will hear him/her shouting: “bil arbiya taarabet…makanhamlekch” only in this instance the Arabic language is used… to tell the truth. We can conclude from the above that Arabic is the language of the genuine Moroccan people while French is for the fake ones.

“Emancipate yourself from mental slavery (because) none but ourselves can free our mind” B. Marley.
This is very dear to my heart “Moroccan Identity” and dialect spoken. First of all one has to know what is Moroccan and what is not. The beauty of our dialect is the mixture of languages some wards are Berber, Arabic, French, Sapnish, Italian, Portuguese, English (American), Russian or Greek and over the years are Moroccanised. Thast is not the problem. When old folks say “jenafou” we all understand they really “je m’en fou” or when we used to play marbles we used to say “nobouzebi” which means “no bouge pas la bille”. Now this generation coming up don’t use our mother tongue Moroccan but are moving away from it just to prove their level of education. The government are not helping either; most offices now everyone speaks French only. Moroccan Living in France, when they go back to Morocco they expect everyone to speak French back to them.

Our problem is to do with pride and dignity. In hotels I stayed in I refused to speak to anyone in French in fact even the French people who assume we have to. I corrected them each time they said more than one ward and you can guess how popular I became among the staff and the guests.
Having a conversation with a Moroccan girl from Fes to casa after she rang her father a commander in the army and spoke to him in French the entire conversation (Ok it was perfect no faults and no accent either) . that girl had no personality she thinks everyone speaks French and had problem expressing herself in Moroccan when I said I never speak French back home I speak only Moroccan. Someone else joined the conversation saying that job interviews are conducted in French only even for posts of a clerk.
The mental colonization is more serious than occupying the territory. They have to revive the way people think. The large number of French tourist invading Morocco each year in search of a cheap holiday is costing the country priceless values in return. The jobless local youth and even elderly have to speak French to try and earn a few miserable DH from the mean French tourist.
It is fine to address the problem on a forum but the authority have to shake their fat asses of comfy arm chairs and do something for the economy and raise everyone’s standard of living.
Why our money has no value outside, our hotels and restaurants are too cheap, everything is cheap from outside and too expensive from the inside. How would the locals feel with the technique of “looking in looking out”? They are promoting the West to every citizen.
As soon as one mentions I live a broad the reply is “sa3datik”! Do you know of any “contarada” anywhere? Everyone wants to leave abroad equipped with hope, language or physical appearance. Is the authority blind? Over 99% of the population want to immigrate in search of loaf of bread. Is this acceptable in any government?
Yes there are changes that are more of a distraction of the reality than help. Take for example the twin tours in El Maarif. Who owns them? Who is registered in the “Mohafada” as the owner? Who made the plans to build them? Were the plans approved legally? Where that money came from? Why most of the floors are empty and locked?
Have nice day



Adds adds jazz but never subtract music
Hi there!

No, I prefer by far "Ouhibouk"!!!!

The arabic language ( I mean the one of the Holy Book) is one of the most beautiful idioms ever spoken...!

Sounds classy and romantic...

French is also elegant!

Have a sweet nightwinking smiley

Latifa


Quote
Proudly Moroccan
Hi Latifa,

Do not fear for the loss of the Moroccan heritage because it just won’t happen. French has always been the dominating language after Arabic and Berber in Morocco. Then, comes Spanish in the north of the country. As you know, this is one of the negative impacts that were left by the occupation but it doesn’t mean by any means that things should carry on like that.

Our people should wake up and smell the roses. The French language has nothing that is nicer or more romantic than any other languages. Unfortunately and according to some Moroccans, It seems that nothing has a value unless it is said in French or carries a French name…. even animals. How many pets (dogs or cats) do you know are given names in Arabic? Not necessarily a human being’s name but any name in Arabic.

The problem back home is that the majority of those who use the French language are mixing French and Arabic which led to the birth of a new dialect (Aranssia), soon we will have our own “Moroccan Créole”!!!
Back home, it is more acceptable and easier when expressing one’s love to say “je t’aime” than “Ouhibouk” or “kanbghik” !!!! it is believed to be more refined and adequate to say it in French and the chances to hear “C’est réciproque” or “Je t’aime moi aussi” are far greater than if said in Arabic!!! Another example: “est ce que tu peux me prêter cent Dirham s.t.p?” is believed to be lighter than “sillifni chi myat DH afaak!” and the asking person wants to give you the impression that you are dealing with an “educated” person with European “values” who will pay you back!!! People in Morocco use French mostly in embarrassing situations when thinking that Arabic is too straightforward. Some use French when they want to lie. Try to insist on somebody to tell you the truth and you will hear him/her shouting: “bil arbiya taarabet…makanhamlekch” only in this instance the Arabic language is used… to tell the truth. We can conclude from the above that Arabic is the language of the genuine Moroccan people while French is for the fake ones.

“Emancipate yourself from mental slavery (because) none but ourselves can free our mind” B. Marley.



Elegance is an attitude

Thank you, my dear friends, for all your sweet messages, I love you too...
Hi everybody,

Sorry guys for taking time to get back to you.

I noticed that the English forum has been quiet for the last few days and there were no new discussions. Are we running short of subjects or what!!!? I guess it was just a question of having a break since I don't want to put the Yabiladians' creativity or imagination in doubt.

From my side, I was enjoying and learning from the discussions of some subjects that took place on this forum over the last few years and once again I was blown away by some contributions that were really of high standards.

Thank you brother 'adds' for keeping the flame going on with your contributions on this forum. I like your 'sociolinguistic' approach and the way you analysed some alien expressions that are still used in our Moroccan dialect “nobouzebi” which means “no bouge pas la bille" that reminds me of my childhood!! I wonder if the expression is still in use nowadays!grinning smiley

Sweet Latifa, Thank you for your contribution. I personally don't believe in the supremacy of a language over another one. I still remember when we were taught that there is no beautiful language or an ugly one, no difficult language or an easy one... It is the way that the language is used that matters and that is what makes the beauty or the ugliness of a language. I am just against the importance that some Moroccans give to the French language over the Moroccan dialect(s), the classical Arabic on any other foreign languages. I firmly believe that there are Moroccans who are polyglot in the sense that they speak at least three languages or more, which is the case of most yabladians for instance. According to nowadays’ standards, the analphabet is the one who speaks and writes only one language!!!!

“I prefer by far "Ouhibouk"!!!! “.... I respect your choice but don’t expect a frenchie to tell you that; even if he manages to, you will feel that he is false or is joking. It is just like a Moroccan saying to another “Ich liebe dich” or “te amo muito meu amor”!!!! Go and try it back home and you will see the expression on their faces. Say it in French and it will be ok!!!!!!!!!



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 04/13/2010 04:45PM by Proudly Moroccan.
Salamsmiling smiley

I am not talking about supremacy or whatever...I was just mentioning the beauty of the Arabic Languagesmiling smiley

And no need to state that beauty is subjective...

Well, to be honest, we must try to learn the language of our forefathers...It's really important to keep the cultural heritage going!

Believe me, I have already heard "Ouhibouk" from a french guy, it's was just too romantic!

OUps, time is really flying, I feel sleepy...

Write to you soonsmiling smiley

Sweet Dreams.

Latifa


Quote
Proudly Moroccan
Hi everybody,

Sorry guys for taking time to get back to you.

I noticed that the English forum has been quiet for the last few days and there were no new discussions. Are we running short of subjects or what!!!? I guess it was just a question of having a break since I don't want to put the Yabiladians' creativity or imagination in doubt.

From my side, I was enjoying and learning from the discussions of some subjects that took place on this forum over the last few years and once again I was blown away by some contributions that were really of high standards.

Thank you brother 'adds' for keeping the flame going on with your contributions on this forum. I like your 'sociolinguistic' approach and the way you analysed some alien expressions that are still used in our Moroccan dialect “nobouzebi” which means “no bouge pas la bille" that reminds me of my childhood!! I wonder if the expression is still in use nowadays!grinning smiley

Sweet Latifa, Thank you for your contribution. I personally don't believe in the supremacy of a language over another one. I still remember when we were taught that there is no beautiful language or an ugly one, no difficult language or an easy one... It is the way that the language is used that matters and that is what makes the beauty or the ugliness of a language. I am just against the importance that some Moroccans give to the French language over the Moroccan dialect(s), the classical Arabic on any other foreign languages. I firmly believe that there are Moroccans who are polyglot in the sense that they speak at least three languages or more, which is the case of most yabladians for instance. According to nowadays’ standards, the analphabet is the one who speaks and writes only one language!!!!

“I prefer by far "Ouhibouk"!!!! “.... I respect your choice but don’t expect a frenchie to tell you that; even if he manages to, you will feel that he is false or is joking. It is just like a Moroccan saying to another “Ich liebe dich” or “te amo muito meu amor”!!!! Go and try it back home and you will see the expression on their faces. Say it in French and it will be ok!!!!!!!!!



Elegance is an attitude

Thank you, my dear friends, for all your sweet messages, I love you too...
Salam bent bladi,

How on earth did you get out of your usual "sweetness" Latifa?grinning smiley Was it because of the different points of view that we have or because you just realized that the French guy's "ouhibouk" doesn't sound “too romantic” anymore!!? Just kiddinggrinning smiley No my dear don’t fool yourself, it won’t be romantic at all if it doesn’t come from “the real Mc coy” and it certainly doesn’t come from his heart as he is more focusing on his pronunciation; thus sounding just like a parrot uttering words without knowing their real impact. I am talking in general and not only about your “French guy”.

Now seriously, please don't get me wrong; I love classical Arabic just as much as you do and I do not deny the beauty of the Koran's Arabic (chaklan wa maddmounan) and I do not have anything against the French language. As indicated by my pseudo name, I am just another proud Moroccan who has the right to refuse the linguistic domination of the French language in his home country; especially after over a half century of independence!!!!
I am not saying that we should do away with the French language in Morocco I am just scared for the loss of the Moroccan identity and as you said “It's really important to keep the cultural heritage going!”
You see! Our views do not differ from each other or at least our goals are the same; except for the “Ouhibouk” story of your French Romeo………. I don't agree with it, I am Moroccan......I am just a jealous guy! grinning smiley
Salamwinking smiley

Hope you're kidding...My usual sweetness never leaves mewinking smiley

Well, ok, his accent was not that bad but the way he said it...

Anyway, you made me laugh...smiling smiley

Have a sweet, sweet evening...

Latifa



Elegance is an attitude

Thank you, my dear friends, for all your sweet messages, I love you too...
Hi there sweet Sweetlatifawinking smiley,

Thank you for keeping me company with you contribitions.
Where is everybody on this forum? Are they taking a break or did they move to another forum? Are the Anglophone Moroccans becoming instinct!? Please tell me what is happening? I feel like I am talking to myselfHeu Otherwise could you advise me where I can find my bunch of Moroccans as I miss them already.
I know you are “a double agent” since you are also active on the French forum winking smiley unlike me I have only this one which is becoming like an empty big housesad smiley

Please helpSOS I rely on your SWEETNESS winking smiley



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 04/15/2010 01:23PM by Proudly Moroccan.
Hi Proudly Moroccansmiling smiley

To be honest, I don' have a clue...You know, the French speaking part is much more popular...But I am sure it's just a matter of time...

Well, I thought you had some knowledge in french...But maybe I'm wrong...

You're not completely alone...I'm here with you !!!! Well, when I have time...

Write to you soon...winking smiley

Latifa



Elegance is an attitude

Thank you, my dear friends, for all your sweet messages, I love you too...
"Sweet bent bladi",

Thank you for the support.

Nothing wrong with my French. Actually I speak it every single day since I am presently on a contract in an African French speaking country. It is just that I prefer English and see myself more Anglophone than Francophone but always Proudly MoroccanWelcome

After all, I will probably pay you a visit.......on the French forum.spinning smiley sticking its tongue out

Look forward to your mail.

Have a lovely week end.
Salamsmiling smiley

As a Morocan, I'll give you a warm welcome...

See you on the French version...

A bientôt (Inshallah)tongue sticking out smiley

Wishing you a sweet week end,

Latifa



Quote
Proudly Moroccan
"Sweet bent bladi",

Thank you for the support.

Nothing wrong with my French. Actually I speak it every single day since I am presently on a contract in an African French speaking country. It is just that I prefer English and see myself more Anglophone than Francophone but always Proudly MoroccanWelcome

After all, I will probably pay you a visit.......on the French forum.spinning smiley sticking its tongue out

Look forward to your mail.

Have a lovely week end.



Elegance is an attitude

Thank you, my dear friends, for all your sweet messages, I love you too...